Skip to Content
Download the full-sized image of Superdeep diamond
Download the file

Actions

Download Analytics Citations

Launch Preview

Export to: EndNote

Collections

This file is in the following collections:

2017 Scientific Images Contest Winners

Superdeep diamond Open Access (recommended)

This is a rough diamond weighing nearly one third of a carat (about the size of a pea). Diamonds, a form of pure carbon, are formed under immense pressures found 100 miles underground. Ancient volcanic eruptions carried diamonds to the surface worldwide. In western Brazil, diamonds like this one have superdeep origins they formed below 500 miles depth. Scientists study these superdeep diamonds because mysterious water-rich minerals are trapped inside them; minerals found nowhere else on Earth.

Descriptions

Resource type(s)
Image
Keyword
Diamond
Superdeep diamonds
Volcanic eruptions
Pure carbon
Water-rich minerals
Rights
All rights reserved
Creator
Wenz, Michelle Dawn
Abstract
This image originally appeared as part of Northwestern's Scientific Images Contest. The contest and subsequent exhibitions are organized by Science in Society, the university's research center for science education and public engagement. Further information and opportunities to participate are available on their website. Prints and canvas editions of these Northwestern research images can also be purchased online (with the small net profit going to science education and outreach programming in the Chicago area).
Related URL
Digital Publisher
Science in Society
Original Publisher
Science in Society
Date Created
2017
Language
English
Subject: MESH
Diamond
Location
Evanston, Illinois, United States
DOI
10.18131/G3QH9X
ARK
ark:/c8131/g3qh9x

File Details

File Properties
Mime type: image/jpeg
File size: 16661.7 kB