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Comparison of IgG and neutralizing antibody responses after one or two doses of COVID-19 mRNA vaccine in previously infected and uninfected individuals. Open Access (recommended)

Descriptions

Resource type(s)
Journal Article
Keyword
COVID-19
SARS-CoV-2
Serological testing
IgG
ELISA
Dried blood spots
Vaccine
Neutralizing
Receptor binding domain
Rights
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States

Creator
Demonbreun, Alexis R.
Sancilio, Amelia Elizabeth McMullen
Velez, Matt P.
Ryan, Daniel T.
Saber, Rana
Vaught, Lauren A.
Reiser, Nina L.
Hsieh, Ryan R.
D'Aquila, Richard T.
Mustanski, Brian
McNally, Elizabeth M.
McDade, Thomas W.
Abstract
Background: Recent reports have suggested that among individuals previously infected with SARS-CoV-2, a single mRNA vaccine dose is sufficient to elicit high levels of immunity. Methods: We compared anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor binding domain (RBD) IgG antibody concentrations and antibody-mediated neutralization of spike-angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE2) receptor binding in vitro following vaccination of non-hospitalized participants by sero-status and acute virus diagnosis history. Participants were analysed before and after mRNA vaccination (BNT162b2/Pfizer or mRNA-1273/Moderna) in a community-based, home-collected, longitudinal serosurvey in the Chicago area (USA); none reported hospitalization for COVID-19. Samples were collected in January and February 2021. Before vaccination, some reported prior positive acute viral diagnostic testing and were seropositive (COVID-19+); the others who did not report acute viral diagnostic testing were categorized as seropositive or seronegative based on anti-spike RBD IgG test results. Findings: Of 307 unique vaccine recipients, 46 reported a prior COVID-19 diagnosis and were seropositive (COVID-19 +). Of the 261 with no history of acute viral diagnostic testing, 117 were seropositive and 144 seronegative before vaccination. The median age was 38 years (range 21-83) with 67 female and 33% male; 40% were non-White. Responses were evaluated after one (n = 142) or two (n = 191) doses of BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273 vaccine. After one dose, median post-vaccine IgG concentration and percent surrogate neutralization were each significantly higher among the COVID-19+ (median 48.2 mu g/ml, IgG; > 99.9% neutralization) compared to the seropositives (3.6 mu g/ml IgG; 56.5% neutralization) and seronegatives (2.6 mu g/ml IgG; 38.3% neutralization). The latter two groups reached > 95% neutralization after the second vaccine dose. Interpretation: After one dose of mRNA vaccine, individuals previously diagnosed with COVID-19 responded with high levels of anti-RBD IgG and surrogate neutralization of spike-ACE2 interaction. One dose of mRNA vaccine was not sufficient to generate comparably high responses among most persons previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 without a clinical COVID-19 diagnosis, nor among seronegative persons. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Original Bibliographic Citation
Demonbreun AR, Sancilio A, Velez MP, Ryan DT, Saber R, Vaught LA, Reiser NL, Hsieh RR, D'Aquila RT, Mustanski B, McNally EM, McDade TW. Comparison of IgG and neutralizing antibody responses after one or two doses of COVID-19 mRNA vaccine in previously infected and uninfected individuals. Eclinicalmedicine. 2021;38:7.
Related URL
Publisher
ELSEVIER
Date Created
2021-08
Original Identifier
(PMID) 34278286
Language
English
Subject: MESH
COVID-19 Vaccines
SARS-CoV-2--drug effects
COVID-19 Serological Testing
Antibodies, Neutralizing
Subject: LCSH
COVID-19 vaccines
Immunoglobulin G
Grants and funding
National Science Foundation
National Science Foundation (NSF) [2035114]
United States Department of Health & Human Services
National Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [3UL1TR001422-06S4]
Northwestern University Office of Research
DOI
10.1016/j.eclinm.2021.101018

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