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Masters in Public Health CE Papers

Adverse childhood experiences and successful adult health and economic outcomes: a cross-sectional study Open Access (recommended)

A Northwestern University Capstone Project

Descriptions

Resource type(s)
Masters Thesis
Keyword
public health
adverse childhood experiences
Rights
Attribution 3.0 United States

Creator
Allchin, Alexa
Feinglass, Joseph M
Abstract
Background: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are stressful or traumatic events experienced in childhood and are related to the development of a broad range of health problems throughout a person's lifespan. Reporting four or more ACEs is strongly associated with adult health and social problems, however, there is a lack of research studying individuals ability to overcome ACEs and achieve successful outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the proportion of individuals who reported four or more ACEs who attained 'successful' health and economic outcomes as adults.Methods: Data were obtained from the Centers' for Disease Control and Prevention's 2011-2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from nine states with respondents to the ACEs question module (N=86,968), and were presented as weighted estimates to be representative of the approximate 32 million adult state residents. 'Successful' adult health was defined as excellent, very good, or good self-reported health and economic 'success' was defined as being in the upper 50% of household income in an age group. The likelihood of health and economic 'success' across four categories of reported ACEs are reported.Results: Comparing respondents who reported zero ACEs to those reporting four or more, 93.5% versus 84.1% of age 18-34 attained successful health outcomes, respectively, and 56.3% versus 44.9% attained successful economic outcomes. Of respondents age 35-54, 86.3% and 49.7% with an ACE count of zero attained successful health and successful economic outcomes, respectively, compared to 74.5% and 38.2% of respondents with an ACE count of four or more. Among respondents age 55 and over, 77.0% and 58.5% with an ACE count of zero attainedsuccessful health and successful economic outcomes, respectively, compared to 64.9% and 59.2% of respondents with an ACE count of four or more, all comparisons p <0.001.Conclusion: Study findings indicate those with four or more ACEs attain significantly fewer 'successful' health and economic outcomes compared to those with zero ACEs, however, a majority of those with high ACE counts were successful under the definitions used in the study. More research is needed on patterns of resilience among those who have successfully coped with ACEs.
Publisher
DigitalHub. Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center
Date Created
2018
Language
English
Subject: MESH
Child Abuse
Child Abuse, Sexual
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse
Health Status
Quality of Life
Income
Socioeconomic Factors
Subject: Geographic Name
United States
DOI
10.18131/G3D45T
ARK
ark:/c8131/g3d45t

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File size: 281.2 kB